Wednesday, June 26, 2013

Common Evening Primrose June 26, 2013

Wildflower Wednesday:
Oenothera biennis, Common Evening Primrose
Native to eastern North America, from Canada to the Gulf of Mexico,
it has been introduced and naturalized all across the continent and into Europe.
It is sometimes called Evening Star or Sun Drop.
A biennial, it spends a year establishing itself, and then blooms in the second year.
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Outdoor Wednesday:
It puts up a tall bloom stalk and opens a few buds each evening.
It is very interesting to watch the buds as they suddenly pop open at sunset.
On a cloudy day the blooms may remain open until noon.
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ABC Wednesday:
X is for..."X marks the spot"
Notice the greenish cross in the center of the bloom.
X marks the spot for pollinators!
Moths, butterflies, and bees are the primary pollinators, but
Hummingbirds may occasionally visit, too.

Have a wonderful Wednesday!
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Visit Gail at Clay and Limestone for more Wildflower Wednesday:  Click Here!

For wonderful outdoor photos, visit Outdoor Wednesday:  Click Here!

For "X" words and photos, visit ABC Wednesday:  Click Here!


20 comments:

  1. Very pretty spot of evening color!

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  2. Neat flower. I've noticed a lot less bees this year.

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  3. Ah, I see those x's!
    ROG, ABC Wednesday team

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  4. Happy Wildflower Wednesday Lea. I do love the Oenotheras, such a wonderful plant family. Love the x's. gail

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  5. Those are great photos. I had it growing in the backyard but pulled it up mistake. As I recall, it had a lovely evening fragrance. Have a great day!

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  6. Very unique X post. Good job find those X's.
    Ann

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  7. I took evening primrose tablets to help with menopausal symptoms. They worked better than what the Dr. had me try. Thank goodness!

    Leslie
    abcw team

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  8. I love these, we have only the pink ones here. The yellow are so cheery. That little "x" is very distinct.

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  9. Lovely bright flowers. I grew up in Texas where there were a lot of the pink Evening Primroses. I may have seen the yellow one up here one year.

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  10. X marks the spot.....great series of photographs.
    JM Illinois

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  11. Lovely shots of a very pretty flower.

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  12. Hi Lea, I didn't know this is a biennial. I wonder if it's what I have that I think is the same thing. I'll have to figure it out. Are these spreaders?

    You are right about milkweed being hard to transplant. I've never grown it from seed, except for the common milkweed that was planted by nature. I hope that works for you. I think you'll enjoy the Swamp milkweed.

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  13. I wasn't familiar with those other memes. Thanks for that info! I have Evening Primrose in my garden, too. It's pretty when it's blooming, but kind of scraggly when not blooming. Fortunately, mine is located amidst a bed of many other perennials. Happy Wildflower Wednesday!

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  14. Great photos and good for you with your X -es. Your header is outstanding and echoes my heart.

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  15. I love evening primrose! Mine self seeds and blooms every year. P. x

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  16. It is so lovely to see plants I don't have, haven't seen before, and beautiful. How tempting to get them...perhaps next year if I wasn't so busy this year.

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  17. Happy Wildflower Wednesday Lea. We have the Oenotheras in Bulgaria also.

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  18. Common plant presented in an uncommonly pretty light. Good post.

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  19. I just love the color of the yellow oenotheras. Beautiful photos Lea.

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  20. We have these at the nearby Arboretum, but it is difficult to catch them in bloom when the preserve closes at sunset. Love the bottom pic!

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